Ruth Allman's Sourdough Hotcake Recipe

While there are many high quality versions to be found in fine eating establishments throughout the state, to achieve the authentic Alaska sourdough experience, consider trying your hand at making and nurturing your own starter at home. It will return the favor and nurture you. Here are Ruth’s starter and famous “flaming sourdough hotcakes” recipes.

December 01, 2017

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sourdough starter, fed and active (method below)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil or melted butter
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
Ruth Allman’s Sourdough Starter Recipe
  • 4-5 scrubbed potatoes, quartered
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ teaspoon yeast (optional)

Preparation

Place the sourdough in a medium-to-large sized bowl.

Add all ingredients except the baking soda, and stir well.

Dilute the baking soda into roughly ⅛ cup warm water, and fold gently into the batter.

Heat griddle to medium, and plop the batter (should be foamy after adding baking soda) ⅓ cup at a time onto it.

Flip after a few minutes. Serve hot with toppings of your choice.

Ruth Allman’s Sourdough Starter Recipe (adapted)

Cover the potatoes with water and boil until fork tender. Mash with potato water to create a thick paste. Add sugar and flour (and yeast if using), and mix well into a smooth, creamy batter. Place in a sturdy glass or ceramic container or crock, allowing for enough room for the starter to “grow” by at least a third. Cover and set in a warm place (countertop by the stove works fine) for 24 hours.

After 24 hours, starter should show signs of fermentation and some bubbles should appear on the surface. Add 2 tablespoons of flour and mix well with a non-metallic spoon; if batter seems too thick (it should be a thick, creamy batter, not a “dough”), add a little water 1 tablespoon at a time.

Cover and set in warm area again. Repeat this process every 12-24 hours for one week. At this point you can “feed” and water your sourdough one last time, cover tightly, and place in the refrigerator to slow the fermentation. You can keep it there for a few weeks at a time without having to feed it.

When you are ready to use your starter for this recipe, you must “activate” it first. Remove the original batch from the refrigerator at least 24 hours before you need it. Stir and measure out approximately 1 cup of starter. Feed with 1 cup flour and 1 cup water and leave out at room temperature (some people add a teaspoon of sugar to speed up the process). After about 12 hours the starter should have started to grow in size. It will be thick, bubbly, and frothy when it’s fully “alive” and ready to use.

When you’re ready to make hotcakes, measure out 2 cups of active sourdough for the recipe and return any remaining starter to the refrigerator.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sourdough starter, fed and active (method below)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil or melted butter
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
Ruth Allman’s Sourdough Starter Recipe
  • 4-5 scrubbed potatoes, quartered
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ teaspoon yeast (optional)
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